7 Ways to Get Your Teen to Clean His Room

February 21st, 2018
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When it comes to personal space, your teen’s bedroom is his first big step into the world of adulthood. By teaching your kid to clean his own room, you’re actually teaching him the important habits of creating a routine and keeping his own space tidy, organized and clean. To be responsible for his personal space and other people’s properties.

Boys and girls are both struggling and fighting the daily chores and this is normal. Who can blame them? Cleaning is not exactly a fun activity. Try to remember how did you feel about it when you were a teenager. But it’s a lesson all teenagers need to learn.

The recognition for a clean and tidy space grows over time when a person starts to buy his own things with his own money. So don’t be surprised or think your teenagers are bad, just because they did not develop the skills yet.

 

1. Be ok with imperfection

The most important reason to teach your teen to clean its own room is to create good habits in him. Be okay with the fact that some days your teens will have a bad day, will be tired, grumpy or simply won’t feel like to clean their room. Listen and understand them. If this is not happening often, just let it go. Respect their own feelings and don’t be a hypocrite. Do you want to clean the kitchen after a long, hard day at work? Sure not. Your kids may not have as many responsibilities as you do, but they have feelings as well. Let them relax and agree with them to do the chores on the next day. They might also be thankful and more inclined to do them later, as you respected their personal feelings.

 

2. Lead by example

You can’t expect your teen to consider cleaning their room when the rest of the house is not exactly spotless. Lead them by example. They will be more likely to clean if they don’t feel like their being punished. It’s your responsibility to show them that every person in your house is responsible for maintaining it.

 

3. Help them

Leave the vacuum cleaner on the floor, the detergents on some shelve, put a laundry basket in the middle of the room, just help them get started. If they’re overwhelmed with exams or sports competitions, why not help them clean the room. They will appreciate it and will be most likely to return the favour.

 

4. Supply them with all they need

There is a chance that your teen is not that into cleaning their room because they don’t have the space for all of their items. Check the room comprehensive. Does it have a garbage bin? Does your kid need extra storage for his clothes? Maybe a bigger desk for all his paperwork? Look around and see what you can do to improve the whole shape of the room. They will appreciate it.

 

5. Make it fun

If there is a cleaning task that needs to be done, but your kid hates doing it, try to make it funnier. Agree on a specific time where the thing needs to be done. Let them play some music, favourite tv show or stand up comedy and let them enjoy the time to themselves in their own way. They will be energized and inspired to finish the task faster.

 

6. Respect their privacy

Explain to your teen that you require their room to be organized and clean. Set a schedule with a certain task to be done, but let him choose anything else in their room like posters, colors, decors. Make him feel like the place is his own, no matter the fact that the house is yours. Giving your kid the responsibility of a room they created and feel comfortable in it can make them put more effort in keeping it neat.

 

7. Reward them

One of the best ways to make your child takes more responsibilities is to show that his hard effort is being noticed and rewarded. Let them go out to a favorite concert, watch a good movie together or go for ice cream. Make sure to use this method only when you can see that they don’t feel like doing the task at all, not on a daily basis and don’t break the promises you made.

 

 

Be understandable and supportive. Treat your teen like an adult. It’s about giving the life skills and responsibilities. Give the feeling of belonging to your family community.

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